Answers

These are the arguments that the defense built their case around and spun into appearing as though there was a vast conspiracy perpetrated by the LAPD. The defense team did an admirable job forcing the jury to forget that the LAPD was not some monster bent on destroying OJ, but is instead an undermanned, underfunded organization of humans and humans make mistakes. Sometimes there are errors in judgment, or errors in minor detail recollections or just harsh cross-examination that causes a person to say something like, "I collected 8 mL of blood" instead of "I collected about 8 mL of blood." Chronically understaffed, LAPD has 1 officer for every 426 residents which is about half as many officers per residents as other major cities. Naturally, overworked are going to make more mistakes and have less time to invest in each individual case. As the saying goes, hindsight is 20/20 and when reading this page, you'll see that there are simple, easy explanations for everything from why the glove didn't fit to why passengers didn't see any blood in the Bronco. Unfortunately, during the stress of an extremely high-profile courtroom trial, with defense lawyers hammering those on the stand, it is hard to present these reasonable responses to the questions raised during the trial. You can make your own calculations as to whether the errors were deliberate and intentional or merely human error. Credible answers for phony arguments about police planting of evidence and police conspiracy to frame OJ Simpson for the murders of Ron Goldman and Nicole Brown.

Socks?
Fuhrman?
Rockingham Glove?
Bundy Glove?
Blood Trail?
Blood Sample?
Missing Blood?
Blood?
Bronco Blood?
Bruises?
Missed Blood?
Search Warrant?
Glove Fit?
Seen Blood?
Initials?
Eyeglasses?

 

 

 

 

Socks

Question from Michael T. Griffith:

With regard to the so-called "bloody socks," why did the blood
show up on the sock almost two months after the fact (blood was
only found on one sock)? And why, as demonstrated by Dr. Henry
Lee and Professor Herbert MacDonnell, does the blood appear to
have been applied when there was no foot in it? Why were there
no berries, dirt, or soil on the socks? Why would O.J. have worn
these fancy dress socks with a sweatsuit anyway?

These arguments were all answered in the Civil Trial. It was proven from test results, that the blood was not planted, in the testimony of Dr. Robin Cotton.

Triumph of Justice
The Final Judgment on the Simpson Case
Daniel Petrocelli with Peter Knobler

Dr. Cotton explained that when blood is drawn for testing by labs, it is preserved with the chemical EDTA, which stops the DNA in the blood from degrading. (Degradation is simply the breaking down of a chemical into its component parts over time.) But when she compared the degradation levels of Nicole's autopsy vial, Dr. Cotton found the autopsy vial contained the more degraded blood. The blood on the sock was fresher and richer in DNA content than the blood in the vial. Once blood has degraded, it is impossible to raise its DNA count; you can't pony it back up. Under the conspiracy theory, the blood used to plant on the sock came from Nicole's autopsy vial, but that blood had a lower DNA count than the blood on the sock. Nicole's blood was fresher when it spurted out and splashed onto Simpson's sock as he was killing her than two days later when the coroner collected it. This completely destroyed the notion of any planting; its impossible for degraded blood to become fresh again. Nicole's blood on the sock could not have been planted.

SANTA MONICA, CALIFORNIA; MONDAY, JANUARY 27, 1997
MR. LAMBERT

Remember Robin Cotton comes -- and she testified a long time
ago. I hope you all remember. She -- she told that you she
did DNA tests on this same blood from the back spot -- the
very same spot that Dr. Rieders was doing his testimony about
EDTA. And what did she tell you?

This is her Autorad -- remember, she talked to you about auto
radiographs, about when she did the RFLP tests. This one right
here, item 13, that's the socks -- that's the Autorad for the
socks.

This one right here, right here, is Nicole. And what she told
you is that's the blood from Nicole's reference vial. And she
also told you that this blood right here that's in the socks,
this DNA in the socks that's not degraded; it's in really good
shape. And she told you why.

She said if that blood was splashed onto those socks while Mr.
Simpson was committing the murders, and about 30 minutes or so
later, he took off the socks and left them on that rug in his
bedroom, where they air-dried overnight, that is a perfect
condition for preserving the DNA in those socks.

That's just as if a criminalist had taken a swatch right after
Nicole had been slashed and put it to air-dry. That's exactly
the circumstances that she described to us.

And as a consequence, that DNA in the socks, it's not degraded.
Then she said, let's take a look at the DNA out of the reference
vial. See that dark shadow? She said that's degradation. See this?
This is all degradation.

So she said the blood out of the reference vial is pretty degraded.
And she told us why. That reference vial was taken 24 hours after
Nicole was murdered. It had been sitting in her dead body until the
autopsy was done. And she explained that blood degrades under those
conditions, not separately.

So here you have degraded blood in the reference vial, no degraded
blood in the socks. That's what tells Robin Cotton, says therefore,
the blood on the socks couldn't have come out of the reference vial.

The answer to your question as to why there were no berries, dirt or soil on the socks is pretty obvious. Simpson evidently didn't walk outside in dirt or berries with just his socks on. Why would Simpson wear, in your opinion, "fancy dress socks" with a sweatsuit? Probably for the same reason he wore expensive Bruno Magli shoes with a sweatsuit, everything he wore was dark colored to aid in his concealment while committing murder.

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Fuhrman

Question from Michael T. Griffith:

Why did Mark Fuhrman, a detective who had been pushed off the
case at Bundy (i.e., Nicole's house), go on to play such a major
role in the initial investigation at the Rockingham estate (i.e.,
O.J.'s house)?

Evidence Dismissed.
The Inside Story of the Police Investigation of
OJ Simpson.
Det. Tom Lange and Det. Philip Vannatter

At Bundy as detective Lange, Vannatter, and Phillips talk over their crime scene strategy, Lieutenant Rogers joins the conversation and tells Lange and Phillips about Commander Bushey's order: They are suppose to contact OJ Simpson, in person, to help him recover his children. Vannatter asks, "Do we know where he lives?"

Phillip replies, "Well, Fuhrman says he was once up there on a four-fifteen radio call a disturbance of the peace, some sort of domestic dispute. It's just a couple of miles away." Vannatter hears Phillips say that Fuhrman had responded to a previous domestic dispute at Simpson's home, but he does not give it any thought; Lange only hears Phillips say that Fuhrman had once been there on some unspecific radio call.

Phillips comment about a previous "domestic dispute" between OJ Simpson and Nicole Brown passes without further comment.

Lange says to Phillips and Fuhrman, "The four of us are going to go over to Simpson's place. We can meet the guy, make the notification, and get his cooperation for background information down the road. The two of you will stay with Simpson and help him make the arrangements for picking up his kids at your division. Then Phil and I will come back here and handle the bodies and the evidence."

Lieutenant Rogers, as Lange and Vannatter's supervisor, approves of this plan and takes charge of securing the South Bundy crime scene until Lange and Vannatter return.

 

Mark Fuhrman planted the right hand glove at Rockingham.

The problem with this thinking is not only the logic, but the facts. It starts with a major problem. There isn't one shred of evidence that points to anyone planting any evidence in this case, let alone Mark Fuhrman.

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Rockingham Glove

Question from Michael T. Griffith:

Why was the Rockingham glove still moist when Fuhrman found it
if Simpson dropped it seven hours earlier? Both FBI Agent
Bodziak and Professor MacDonnell said blood dries very rapidly.

Triumph of Justice
The Final Judgment on the Simpson Case
Daniel Petrocelli with Peter Knobler

The criminal defense had argued that the Rockingham glove was wet, suggesting Fuhrman had picked it up wet from the murder scene (and somehow preserved its wet condition while transporting it to Rockingham to be planted).

Wrong. Fung described the glove as dry but glistening.

More misinformation by the defense to support an unsupportable theory.

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Bundy Glove

Question from Michael T. Griffith:

Why did the prosecution not call a single police officer to
rebut police photographer Rokahr's testimony that Fuhrman was
pointing at the Bundy glove BEFORE Fuhrman went to Rockingham?
That was at around 4:30 in the morning.

They did. The facts are:

Evidence Dismissed.
The Inside Story of the Police Investigation of
OJ Simpson.
Det. Tom Lange and Det. Philip Vannatter

In testimony LAPD photographer Rolf Rokahr confounds the situation by claiming to have photographed Fuhrman at 4:00 a.m. on the morning after the murders--before Lange and Vannatter arrived--pointing to the left hand glove found at the South Bundy crime scene. In fact, Rokahr had taken this photograph at about 7:00 a.m.--after Fuhrman returned from Simpson's estate on Vannatter's orders. No close-up photographs of the evidence were taken until Lange returned to the South Bundy crime scene from North Rockingham at about 6:50 a.m.

At the time of his testimony, Rokahr is on off-duty status because of his poor health and is under heavy medication. Like Thano Peratis, he has acute heart problems. Consequently, he is a visibly sick and confused witness of whom the defense team takes full advantage. One defense counsel even manages to get Rokahr to state falsely that he was present when the four detectives decided to go over Simpson's wall. Anyone who had followed the case knew that was simply not true.

In addition, during his earlier official interviews with Detective Cliff LeFall on November 22, 1994, Rokahr claimed that he arrived at the South Bundy crime scene at "about midnight." However the official log had him signing in at 3:25 a.m. During his interviews with LeFall, Rokahr also claimed to have arrived before Detectives Phillips and Fuhrman, who in fact, had signed in an hour earlier 2:30. Later he cleared up this confusion.

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Blood Trail

Question from Michael T. Griffith:

If the bloody glove (the Rockingham glove) was dropped on
the walkway behind the house at Rockingham ten minutes after the
murders, why was there no blood or fiber on that south walkway or
on the leaves on which the glove was resting? Why was there no
blood in the 150 feet of narrow walkway or on the stucco wall
abutting it?

Absence of Evidence is not Evidence of Absence.* Who knows, maybe there was blood but it was never seen. A little common sense please, all the blood samples found were on hard surfaces. Cement, Metal, Wood. There was no blood seen or collected from natural surfaces, dirt, leaves, grass, etc. Pretty obvious, isn't it?

* Herbert MacDonell

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Blood Sample

Question from Michael T. Griffith:

For what purpose was Detective Phil Vannatter carrying Mr.
Simpson's blood in his pocket for three hours and a distance of
25 miles instead of booking it as soon as possible according
to standard police procedure? There were two places where he
could have booked this evidence, both of which were very close.

More misinformation from the defense.

Evidence Dismissed.
The Inside Story of the Police Investigation of
OJ Simpson.
Det. Tom Lange and Det. Philip Vannatter

Dershowitz knows that Lange and Vannatter's interview with Simpson at Parker Center on June13 began at 1:35 and ended at 2:07 p.m. After the interview, Simpson was taken to be fingerprinted. Then his left middle finger was photographed in the SID Photo Unit. After that, Simpson agreed to have his blood drawn at the dispensary of the city jail in back of Parker Center.

When Lange, Vannatter, and Simpson returned to the Robbery/Homicide Division at 3:30 p.m., Vannatter had Simpson's blood with him. Simpson and his attorneys, who had returned from lunch left. Up to that time, Vannatter had never even been alone with Simpson's blood. In fact, up to 3:00 p.m. Simpson is Vannatter's best witness that the detective never left the building with his blood.

After Simpson and his attorneys left the office, Lange and Vannatter discussed the situation between them, as well as with Captain Gartland, a man know and respected for his impeccable integrity, until about 4:30 p.m. At that time, Lange and Vannatter drove through rush - hour traffic on the Santa Monica Freeway in their separate cars to Simpson's estate. Vannatter arrived at 5:17 and gave the vial of Simpson's blood to Dennis Fung at 5:20 p.m. - which was documented by a media videotape.

Where was this three - hour period of time Dershowitz refers to that Vannatter was in possession of Simpson's blood - and anywhere near Simpson's estate where this blood had been supposedly planted? When did Vannatter even have the opportunity to have "sprinkled Simpson's blood" around Simpson's home?

Most importantly, the record is clear that all of the blood evidence, including the blood evidence at the South Bundy crime scene - with the exception of the stains on Brown's rear gate - was collected and cataloged by Fung long before Vannatter had returned to Simpson's estate with the vial of blood.

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Missing Blood

Question from Michael T. Griffith:

Why did nurse Thano Peratis testify TWICE, not just once, but
TWICE, that he removed between 7.9 and 8.1 cc's of blood from
O.J., but then, months later, in an unsworn, uncross-examined
video filmed by a prosecution attorney, retract his testimony
and claim he was "mistaken"? Peratis testified at both the grand
jury hearing and at the preliminary hearing that he removed
right around 8 cc's of blood, but the LAPD could only account for
6.5 cc's of that blood.

Evidence Dismissed.
The Inside Story of the Police Investigation of
OJ Simpson.
Det. Tom Lange and Det. Philip Vannatter

Nurse Thano Peratis testified at the criminal trial that he had taken 8 cc's of blood from Simpson's arm. When only 6 1/2 cc could be accounted for, the defense made the great leap and placed the remaining 1 1/2 cc in Phil Vannatter's meat hooks, and from there sprinkled it all over the case. This was a major element in their OJ conspiracy theory. In the civil trial Blaiser put Peratis on the stand to testify about drawing Simpson's blood and to lay the groundwork for a replay of the missing blood.

As it turned out, Peratis, a frail, elderly man, was mistaken, Medvene had talked to him at length and found that, in drawing Simpson's blood, Peratis had not filled the 8 cc test tube to the top. In fact, because of Simpson's muscular arm, Peratis had to use a different syringe device that routinely draws out a bit less blood. "Good luck if you can fill the vial up all the time," Peratis said. "It looked like it was enough blood to test. I said, 'Officers, is this enough?' I heard a 'Yes.' I withdrew the needle." Nurse Peratis had innocently underestimated. There was no missing blood!

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Blood

Question from Michael T. Griffith:

If O.J. walked into his own house wearing the murder clothes
and shoes, why was no soil or so much as a smear or drop of blood
associated with the victims found on the floor, on the white
carpeting, on the doorknobs, on the light switches or on his bedding?

There it is again, why not more evidence? Who knows, maybe what ever he had on the bottom of his shoes rubbed off, from the time he left his Bronco to the time he entered his house. Maybe he was successful in wiping blood off his clothes. Maybe someone cleaned up after him. Absence of Evidence is not Evidence of Absence.*

* Herbert MacDonell

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Bronco Blood

Question from Michael T. Griffith:

If Simpson killed Mr. Goldman in a bloody battle involving
more than two dozen knife wounds and during which Mr. Goldman
remained standing and struggling for several minutes, how was it
that there was less than seven/tenths of one drop of blood
consistent with Mr. Goldman found in the Bronco? Why wasn't the
Bronco blood collected until well after the murders?

The main reason there was so little blood collected is obvious. The evidence shows that Simpson wiped up the blood inside the Bronco. One reason some witnesses testified they hadn't seen blood when they looked into the Bronco was that the blood was hard to see. Simpson had cleaned up the inside of the Bronco as quickly as he could. But even he didn't see all the blood smears he left.

Upon returning from the murders Simpson parked the Bronco on Rockingham. Rockingham did have a street light not far from the estate driveway, but it was still dark outside. Simpson out smarted himself. Sometime before he parked the Bronco at the murder scene, he removed the light bulb from the overhead light, so the light would not reveal him when he opened the Bronco door. But he never put the bulb back in. This may have been why he didn't do a very good job of wiping up all the blood from inside the Bronco. The blood samples from the console, that were collected the day after the murders, were taken from the smears that still could be seen.

Evidence Dismissed.
The Inside Story of the Police Investigation of
OJ Simpson.
Det. Tom Lange and Det. Philip Vannatter

On Friday, August 26, while Lange is at Keystone Tow in Van Nuys, scientific testing is continuing on Simpson's Bronco. The detective watches as the passenger seat of the vehicle is carefully removed by the SID. Crime lab technicians are specifically conducting further testing into the amount of blood contained in the vehicle. Using the substance Luminol, a sophisticated but toxic spray-on chemical that makes blood glow in the dark, the technicians find several additional locations of blood evidence in the Bronco. They are quickly collected and cataloged by a SID criminalist.

See for yourself

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Bruises

Question from Michael T. Griffith:

If O.J. had a bitter struggle with Ron Goldman, why were
there no bruises or marks on Simpson's body? (The LAPD initially
said Goldman struggled violently with his assailant, but later
reversed itself.)

Once again, Absence of Evidence is not Evidence of Absence.* Come on, Simpson was a 200 pound, 6 foot former world class athlete. He was strong, had the element of surprise, and the advantage of a lethal weapon. He overpowered Ron Goldman. Ron Goldman fought for his life, and if not for that fact, Simpson would never have left all the evidence he did leave.

* Herbert MacDonell

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Missed Blood

Question from Michael T. Griffith:

Why did the bloodstains with the most DNA not show up until
WEEKS after the murders (i.e., those on the socks and those on
the back gate)?

You have things mixed up. In the case of the blood on the back gate at South Bundy, that blood was first seen by the two officers Robert Riske and Miguel Tarrazas, who were the first to arrive at the murder scene. The blood was not collected until July 3. The socks also were seen the next day, but the blood on the socks wasn't found until later, when the socks were tested for blood. The socks do have that in common with the back gate, both were not tested until some time later, but it is a meaningless fact.

The blood on the gate was seen, but was missed being collected due to a police supposed oversight, which when investigated was attributed to an intentional error by a supervisor for the crime lab, playing politics with the evidence for completely unrelated reasons. Actually Lange accepts the responsibility for the error.

Evidence Dismissed.
The Inside Story of the Police Investigation of
OJ Simpson.
Det. Tom Lange and Det. Philip Vannatter

When Lange had left the South Bundy crime scene to go downtown and to interview Simpson at about 12:30 on June 13, he ordered all of the investigators and criminalists to finish the work he had assigned and then break down the crime scene. They were all professionals and did not need someone hovering over them while they did their work.

Because of his presence at Parker Center, Lange, as the lead detective, was not available to conduct his usual final walk-through of the crime scene - in which he makes sure that everything that needed to be done has been done. By the time Lange left Parker Center at 4:30 P.M., the South Bundy crime scene had already been broken down forty-five minutes earlier, at 3:45 P.M. Unknown to Lange, one task he had assigned was left undone: the collection of the blood on the rear gate.

During a walk-through of the South Bundy crime scene with detectives on July 3, Bill Hodgeman noticed the blood spot on the rear gate and told Lange, who replied that he had caught it on June 13 and asked Dennis Fung to collect it. Hodgeman and Lange called Fung, who did not remember this assignment. Later on July 3, the bloodstains on the rear gate were finally collected.

Lange tried to find out what had happened but could not get a straight answer. Greg Matheson of the SID Serology Unit insisted that he was "out of the loop." Sid trainee Andrea Mazzola said that she did not remember seeing the blood on the gate.

After the Simpson defense began to charge that the blood on the rear gate had been planted by police, the LAPD conducted an administrative inquiry into the circumstances revolving around the failure of its investigators to collect this blood evidence. But there was no final resolution as to what had specifically gone wrong - other than the criminalist had simply overlooked it.

Late the LAPD Internal Affairs Division launched its own probe of this matter. This investigation was based on a written statement from an employee of the LAPD/SID crime lab, who alleged that the blood on the rear gate had not been collected intentionally. According to the employee, the Simpson case came in the midst of a budgetary war among various departments within the LAPD. After Lange had left the South Bundy crime scene to interview Simpson, the employee claimed, a supervisor for the crime lab had specifically instructed Fung not to collect the blood on the rear gate. Playing politics with this evidence, the supervisor allegedly wanted to use this debacle to argue that the crime lab was understaffed and needed a bigger budget.

Triumph of Justice
The Final Judgment on the Simpson Case
Daniel Petrocelli with Peter Knobler

Officer Robert Riske, the blond patrolman who, with his partner, Miguel Tarrazas, was first to arrive on the scene, shortly after midnight, June 13.

With John Kelly doing the direct questioning, Riske laid out the basic crime scene evidence, including the one glove that was found, the hat, the pager, the various items lying next to the bodies, the blood droplets along the alley going away from the two victims and toward the back of the house, the blood in the back driveway, the blood Riske and Terrazas both observed on the back gate. Officer Riske described his actions in securing the crime scene and calling the LAPD for investigators.

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Search Warrant

Question from Michael T. Griffith:

Why did Vannatter lie in the search warrant deposition?

Evidence Dismissed.
The Inside Story of the Police Investigation of
OJ Simpson.
Det. Tom Lange and Det. Philip Vannatter

In his search warrant, Vannatter had made one assumption that was incorrect, two others that were true but unconfirmed at the time, and one omission of fact:

Vannatter had written that Simpson's trip to Chicago was "unexpected." In fact, it had been scheduled for some time. However, Vannatter had based his conclusion on Kato Kaelin deferring to Arnelle Simpson when they first contacted him during the early-morning hours of June 13, asking for Simpson's where-about. Arnelle initially said that she believed her father was in his house. As a result of the statements of both Kaelin and Simpson's daughter, Vannatter believed that Simpson's trip to Chicago was "unexpected."

Also in his warrant, Vannatter omitted that Simpson had voluntarily agreed to return to Los Angeles. However, unlike Lange and Phillips, he had not been party to the phone calls with Simpson at North Rockingham when the notification of his ex-wife's death was made. In the midst of everything that was going on during those early-morning hours on June 13, neither Lange nor Phillips had explained to him that Simpson had volunteered to leave Chicago, as opposed to being ordered by the detectives to return to Los Angeles.

The other mistake Vannatter had made was his premature identification of red spots on the driveway and the red substance on the right-hand glove as blood. Even though Dennis Fung later confirmed this as blood evidence, Vannatter had made these claims in his search warrant without that confirmation, relying instead on his observations from years of experience dealing with blood at crime scenes.

Commenting from the bench - even though there was no evidence of malice on Vannatter's part or that he had deliberately lied - Judge Ito charges, "I cannot make a finding that this was merely negligent. I have to make a finding that this was reckless."

Nevertheless, Ito upholds the search that was based on Vannatter's supposedly "reckless" warrant and admits the challenged evidence.

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Glove Fit

Question from Michael T. Griffith:

Given Professor MacDonnell's testimony that the gloves would
not have shrunk no matter how much blood was smeared on them, and
given that they never shrank from June 21, 1994 until the end of
the criminal trial, despite having been repeatedly frozen
and thawed, why is it that the gloves just didn't fit O.J.?

Triumph of Justice
The Final Judgment on the Simpson Case
Daniel Petrocelli with Peter Knobler

Richard Rubin was the former general manager and vice president of Aris and an expert on the gloves. Rubin was prepared to say positively that the gloves found at the murder scene and at Rockingham were the same type as those Simpson wore in the photos. Rubin had been on the stand when Chris Darden had Simpson try on the murder gloves during the criminal trial. Rubin explained to us that those gloves had been sitting in evidence for a year and a half, they hadn't been stretched, they hadn't been warmed or worn.

Simpson, he said, had an extra-wide palm but not long fingers. It was easy for a person with such a hand to make a glove look like it didn't fit, just stretching out the palm and fingers would make putting them on very difficult. "Imagine trying to put a pair of pants on a crying infant," he told us. That, combined with the drag created by the latex gloves Simpson had been wearing, make it almost impossible.

"The gloves will fit him. There's no question they fit at the criminal trial. It's not a perfect fit, it might not even be a good fit now, because of the shrinkage. It's the quality of the fit that's in question, but the gloves fit." The problem was the big show Simpson had put on, the mugging and the grunting.

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Seen Blood

Question from Michael T. Griffith:

Why did three people who were in the Bronco at different
times after the murders not see anywhere near the amount of blood
that was reportedly in the vehicle? Why did one of those
individuals not see ANY blood on the dash or console, even
though, out of natural curiosity, he looked carefully for it?

The blood in the Bronco was hard to see. Simpson had wiped up what ever he saw. Depending on the lighting condition, if a witness looked into the Bronco, and depending on what that witness was looking for, they could come to that conclusion. Bear in mind most of the blood samples came from the areas on the console Simpson had wiped. Later the police had to use a spray-on chemical that makes blood glow in the dark to find other samples.

See for yourself

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Initials

Question from Michael T. Griffith:

Why did the blood evidence bindles from Bundy submitted at
the trial not have Andrea Mazzola's initials on them, even though
she swore she initialed those bindles?

Chalk this one up to human error. I believe Andrea Mazzola when she testified she remembered that she put her initials on some evidence bindles, during the processing of the samples. I believe she believes it. I just think she is mistaken. This detail was used as proof of the defense phony conspiracy theory.

A theory based on human error.

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Eyeglasses

Question from Michael T. Griffith:

What happened to the one lens that had blood smears on it?
It was seen by Dr. Lee, by Dr. Michael Baden, and by Dr. Wolf.
These experts made a note of them. Dr. Lee, for example, noted
the blood smears on the lens. This lens later disappeared. How?
How does crucial evidence like that just "disappear" from a crime
lab?

To be honest with you I don't know about this. I don't know about any disappearances. But I do not agree with your characterization of this evidence as "crucial". Crucial to what?

Evidence Dismissed.
The Inside Story of the Police Investigation of
OJ Simpson.
Det. Tom Lange and Det. Philip Vannatter

Returning to the front of the house, Lange walks to the end of the walkway and to the top of the cement staircase, facing South Bundy. Nicole Brown's body is at the bottom of the stairs; the unidentified male is to Lange's left in a cramped fenced-in location. Lange can clearly see the blood-splattered white envelope between the two bodies, and the left-hand glove and a blue-knit cap partially hidden under bloodstained foliage near the feet of the dead man.

Carefully walking into the area around the bodies, Lange lifts the corner of the envelope with his pen. Inside he sees a pair of eyeglasses.

Now if you want to build some mystery about Juditha Brown's eyeglasses, good luck.

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